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Taking Classes to the Archives

Emily Suzanne ClarkReaders of the blog might remember that I like to post about teaching. A big part of my teaching is primary sources and that increasingly includes archives. I first blogged about taking a class into the Jesuit archives back in November 2015, shortly after having my American Christianities ...

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Five Questions with Eladio Bobadilla on Immigration and Catholic History

Catherine R. Osborne (for the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism, University of Notre Dame) Eladio Bobadilla Eladio Bobadilla is a Ph.D. candidate in U.S. History at Duke University. His dissertation is entitled “‘One People Without Borders’: The Chicano Roots of the Immigrants Rights Movement, 1954-1994,” and explores ...

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Fun with Polygamy, or, “A House Full of Females” & the Benefits of Teaching Mormon History

Andrea L. Turpin I love Mormon history. I have found a way to work it into literally all the courses I have ever taught. I am neither a Mormon nor a historian of Mormonism, but I’ve discovered that teaching the history of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints ...

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Crossing Parish Boundaries: An Interview with Tim Neary

By Karen Johnson Tim Neary’s recent book Crossing Parish Boundaries: Race, Sports, and Catholic Youth in Chicago, 1914-1954 traces the decades of interracial contact between Chicago’s youth in Bishop Bernard Sheil’s Catholic Youth Organization (CYO).  Tim complicates the argument that working-class white ethnics were some the most anti-black people in ...

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Walking the City

We conclude our roundtable review on Kyle Roberts’ Evangelical Gotham with a reflection from the author himself. Thanks to everyone who contributed to the conversation, and please do chime in below to continue the dialogue. by Kyle Roberts What a genuine pleasure it has been this week to have four thoughtful ...

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On Maps, Faiths, and Works

This next post in our ongoing roundtable review of Kyle Roberts’ Evangelical Gotham comes to us from Christine Croxall. A scholar of the religious histories of the Mississippi River Valley at the dawn of the nineteenth century, Crozall is a postdoctoral research associate at the John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics ...

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Mapping the Women of “Evangelical Gotham”

We continue our series on Kyle Roberts’ Evangelical Gotham with a post from friend of the blog and assistant professor of history at Colgate University Monica Mercado. Where prior posts honed in on the how cities and spaces fit into Robert’s analysis, Mercado highlights the ways in which these concepts both mask ...

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The Places of “Evangelical Gotham”

Today we continue our roundtable review of Kyle Roberts’ Evangelical Gotham with a post from longtime RiAH blogger Lincoln Mullen. You can see the rest of the posts in this series here.  by Lincoln Mullen New York’s churches 1845from Roberts, Evangelical Gotham  In his elegantly written account, Kyle Roberts takes his readers on ...

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A Roundtable on Roberts, “Evangelical Gotham”

Cities have long haunted this history of American evangelicalism. They are sites evangelicals either fear or feel the need to control. But in Evangelical Gotham: Religion and the Making of New York City, 1783-1860 (University of Chicago Press, 2016), Kyle Roberts highlights the ways in which evangelicalism was uniquely suited ...

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Christian Nationalism in American History: A New Series

Mark Edwards Just a quick word to check out a recently completed series on Christian nationalism at Religions.  The eight marvelous essays cover topics ranging from the Native American preacher William Appess, Federalists, and West Point, to Richard Mouw, Donald Trump, the ecumenical movement, evangelical internationalism, and religious pluralism.  I’d like to ...

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